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The Man Who Died Twice: (The Thursday Murder Club 2) by [Richard Osman]

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The Man Who Died Twice: (The Thursday Murder Club 2) Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 49,170 ratings

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From the Publisher

Book 1 Book 2 Book 3
Out Now September 2022

Product description

About the Author

Richard Osman is an author, producer, and television presenter. His first novel, The Thursday Murder Club, was a #1 million-copy international bestseller and a New York Times bestseller; The Man Who Died Twice was also a #1 international bestseller and a New York Times bestseller. Critics have already described The Man Who Died Twice as "his second novel," and his third novel, The Bullet That Missed, is forthcoming. He lives in London with his partner, and Liesl the cat.
--This text refers to the paperback edition.

From the Back Cover

It's the following Thursday.

Elizabeth has received a letter from an old colleague, a man with whom she has a long history. He's made a big mistake, and he needs her help. His story involves stolen diamonds, a violent mobster, and a very real threat to his life.

As bodies start piling up, Elizabeth enlists Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron in the hunt for a ruthless murderer. And if they find the diamonds too? Well, wouldn't that be a bonus?

But this time they are up against an enemy who wouldn't bat an eyelid at knocking off four septuagenarians. Can The Thursday Murder Club find the killer (and the diamonds) before the killer finds them?
--This text refers to an alternate kindle_edition edition.

Product details

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ B08GS1BT6T
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Penguin (16 Sept. 2021)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • File size ‏ : ‎ 2650 KB
  • Text-to-Speech ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Screen Reader ‏ : ‎ Supported
  • Enhanced typesetting ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • X-Ray ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Word Wise ‏ : ‎ Enabled
  • Print length ‏ : ‎ 422 pages
  • Customer reviews:
    4.7 out of 5 stars 49,170 ratings

About the author

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Richard Osman is an author, producer and television presenter. The Thursday Murder Club is his first novel. He is well known for TV shows including Pointless and Richard Osman’s House of Games. As the creative director of Endemol UK, Richard has worked as an executive producer on numerous shows including Deal Or No Deal and 8 Out of 10 Cats. He is also a regular on panel and game shows such as Have I Got News For You, Would I Lie To You and Taskmaster.

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5
49,170 global ratings

Top reviews from United Kingdom

VINE VOICE
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 17 September 2021
367 people found this helpful
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TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 16 September 2021
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1.0 out of 5 stars It is literally painful to read this book.
By Kid Ferrous 🔴🟡🟢 on 16 September 2021
This was not what I expected. I had steeled myself for a cozy-crime story which would, no doubt, be awful but at least be a harmless way of passing some time. However, it’s got “serious” bits in it; but this book is more Val Doonican than Val McDermid. There are moments, basically unskilled shifts in tone, which are probably meant to be shocking but are telegraphed pages in advance, and make the attempt at a serious crime novel look leaden and clumsy.
This book is awful. I punished myself reading it. Every sentence is overwritten to breaking point. It is very hard to care about any of the characters because they are all so badly written. There is one called Elizabeth who is nearly seventy but talks like she’s twenty; one of the many signs of poor characterisation in this book. I suspect she is meant to be the “strong female character” in the story, which is par for the course these days for any book, but this one lacks strong characters of any gender. The villain is bereft of any dimension, let alone the requisite three. This book has three parts and 84 chapters for some reason. 84. This is not the hallmark of competence, and neither is writing a story in the present tense just to be “edgy”.
A plot that does nothing, characters that irritate and attempts at humour that do nothing but irritate, this is the last-minute homework of a talentless amateur desperately trying to avoid failing a creative writing course. No book can literally be painful to read; words on a page cannot actually cause you physical discomfort. But you know what? “The Man Who Died Twice” very nearly makes such a book an excruciating reality. If this is 21st century literature then you have to fear for the future of the written word.
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197 people found this helpful
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Reviewed in the United Kingdom on 18 September 2021
194 people found this helpful
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